NASA’s Solar Spacecraft Presents the Images of the Sun Ruined by the Moon

NASA’s solar observing spacecraft had its clear view of the sun strangely ruined by the moon.

Now THAT’S a photobomb: On July 26, 2014, from 10:57 a.m. to 11:42 a.m. EDT, the moon crossed between NASA¿s Solar Dynamics Observatory and the sun.

On July 26, the spacecraft noticed the moon passed between NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Sun,  a movement dubbed a lunar transit.

Video:

This occurs every two years, causing a partial solar eclipse that can only be seen from SDO’s point of view.

Images of the eclipse show a crisp lunar horizon, because the moon has no atmosphere that would distort light.

By blending different SDO wavelengths, Nasa can get an enhanced image of the sun. This image was the blended result of images taken in 304 wavelength and 171 wavelength.

By blending different SDO wavelengths, Nasa can get an enhanced image of the sun. This image was the blended result of images taken in 304 wavelength and 171 wavelength.

This is very different to when the Earth blocks the solar view and you can see the hazy upper atmosphere allowing some of the brightest active regions penetrate.

The same image in 171 wavelength. eruptions on the solar surface can clearly be seen, while swirls of gas are ejected during storms.

The same image in 171 wavelength. eruptions on the solar surface can clearly be seen, while swirls of gas are ejected during storms.

The SDO has been continuously observing the sun since 2009.

Red hot! The 304 wavelength is emitted from the chromosphere and transition region. SDO images of this wavelength are typically colorized in red.

Red hot! The 304 wavelength is emitted from the chromosphere and transition region. SDO images of this wavelength are typically colorized in red.

The high-definition space observatory orbits the Earth in a very special way that our planet rarely slips into shot.

The moon, however changes its path approximately twice a year.

Via : dailymail